The [Rediscovered] Art of Bunch Riding

Peter Wilborn of BIKELAW looked back at how new riders used to learn valuable road skills in this great post on his blog

The gist of it is that road riding culture is developing a few bad habits that are causing bunch riding to be a lost art form. Things like overnight experts with excessive bikes, experienced riders dropping others and failing to recognise their role as leaders and a basic lack of grace and elegance.

There’s a light at the end of this tunnel, however, and that light is the Tenax Ride!

Here’s a quote from Wilborn’s blog post, “Before the internet, before custom bikes, and before Lance, it was done better. Learning to ride was an apprenticeship. The goal was to become a member of the peloton, not merely a guy who is sort of fast on a bike. Membership was the point, not to be the local Cat. 5* champ. You were invited to go on a group ride if you showed an interest and a willingness to learn…You learned the skills from directly from the leader, who took an interest in riding next to you on your first rides (and not next to his friends, like better riders do today).”

Now I can’t pretend to be a highly experienced and competitive cyclist. I’m not. But every Tenax Ride and every Tenax Rider is committed to helping their fellows riders have fun, get fitter and develop as cyclists (and maybe even as people!).

I reckon that our ride culture is absolutely fantastic, with great opportunities to share what we know. By being a Tenax Rider, you’re an advocate for our supportive, friendly and fun approach to cycling. It’s not necessary for you to come to every Tenax Ride. It’s more important that when you do ride, you embody the Tenax Ride culture and encourage your fellow riders to do the same.

It’s because of you people, the Tenax Riders, that our rides are so much fun. Thank you all!

*Rough equivalent to D or E grade, i.e. the slowest grade in a road race. Also the origin (sort of) of the term Cat 6 racing, which is racing your fellow commuters on the way to work.

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